Oracle 11g, from the Sixties to the Nineties

8 10 2007

Oracle has a feature since 10g called Flashback. It allowed to recover from loss of data in a somewhat more easy way. I have seen some presentations about it and have used it occassionally to recover from inadvertently dropping a table. Dropped by me or others, I am no exception there. One of the presentations was by Lex de Haan called ‘Flash me back, Scotty’, with a nice reference to this and all that it stands for in the sixties. Apparently Oracle marketing has seen that presentation as well and now the feature is advertised as ‘Total Recall‘, totally nineties. A leap into the future using the past.

Now marketing is useful to get the attention, but as true non-believer one needs to see some ‘proof of the pudding’ (I don’t know where I learned that phrase, but it seems appropiate here). Lucas Jellema is publishing currently an excellent series (some examples here, here and here) on the way 11g new features can be put to use, including some ideas and coding to demonstrate their usefulness. The most recent one being about a significant change in the implementation of the Flashback feature. This might also be a convenient way to keep a store of all the changes that have been applied to your datawarehouse. A lot of those datawarehouses already keep a complete history and Total Recall could be an interesting feature to simplify the maintenance of that history.

Of course we are currently in the “zero-ities” or whatever the current epoch is called, so I think Oracle will probably not be completely up to speed yet.

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